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English translation of
Holy Sutta Nipata
English translation by V. Fausböll
taken from http://www.sacred-texts.com/bud/sbe10/

Book 03 Mahavagga : Chapter 12 Dvayatanupassanasutta

So it was heard by me:

At one time Bhagavat dwelt at Sāvatthī in Pubbārāma, Migāramātar's mansion. At that time Bhagavat on the Uposatha day, on the fifteenth, it being full moon, in the evening was sitting in the open air, surrounded by the assembly of Bhikkhus. Then Bhagavat surveying the silent assembly of Bhikkhus addressed them (as follows):

'Whichever Dhammas there are, O Bhikkhus, good, noble, liberating, leading to perfect enlightenment,--what is the use to you of listening to these good, noble, liberating Dhammas, leading to perfect enlightenment? If, O Bhikkhus, there should be people that ask so, they shall be answered thus: "Yes, for the right understanding of the two Dhammas." "Which two do you mean?" "(I mean), this is pain, this is the origin of pain," this is one consideration, "this is the destruction of pain, this is the way leading to the destruction of pain," this is the second consideration; thus, O Bhikkhus, by the Bhikkhu that considers the Dyad duly, is strenuous, ardent, resolute, of two fruits one fruit is to be expected: in this world perfect knowledge, or, if any of the (five) attributes still remain, the state of an Anāgāmin (one that does not return).' This said Bhagavat, (and) when Sugata had said this, the Master further spoke:

1.
'Those who do not understand pain and the origin of pain, and where pain wholly and totally is stopped, and do not know the way that leads to the cessation of pain,

2.
'They, deprived of the emancipation of thought and the emancipation of knowledge, are unable to put an end (to sa/m/sāra), they will verily continue to undergo birth and decay.

3.
'And those who understand pain and the origin of pain, and where pain wholly and totally is stopped, and who know the way that leads to the cessation of pain,

4.
'They, endowed with the emancipation of thought and the emancipation of knowledge, are able to put an end (to sa/m/sāra), they will not undergo birth and decay.

'"Should there be a perfect consideration of the Dyad in another way," if, O Bhikkhus, there are people that ask so, they shall be told, there is, and how there is: "Whatever pain arises is all in consequence of the upadhis (elements of existence)," this is one consideration, "but from the complete destruction of the upadhis, through absence of passion, there is no origin of pain," this is the second consideration; thus, O Bhikkhus, by the Bhikkhu that considers the Dyad duly, that is strenuous, ardent, resolute, of two fruits one fruit is to be expected: in this world perfect knowledge, or, if any of the (five) attributes still remain, the state of an Anāgāmin (one that does not return).' This said Bhagavat, (and) when Sugata had said this, the Master further spoke:

5.
'Whatever pains there are in the world, of many kinds, they arise having their cause in the upadhis; he who being ignorant creates upadhi, that fool again undergoes pain; therefore being wise do not create upadhi, considering what is the birth and origin of pain.

'"Should there be a perfect consideration of the Dyad in another way," if, O Bhikkhus, there are people that ask so, they shall be told, there is, and how there is: "Whatever pain arises is all in consequence of avi/gg/ā (ignorance)," this is one consideration, "but from the complete destruction of avi/gg/ā, through absence of passion, there is no origin of pain," this is the second consideration; thus, O Bhikkhus, by the Bhikkhu that considers the Dyad duly, that is strenuous, ardent, resolute, of two fruits one fruit is to be expected: in this world perfect knowledge, or, if any of the (five) attributes still remain, the state of an Anāgāmin (one that does not return).' This said Bhagavat, (and) when Sugata had said this, the Master further spoke:

6.
'Those who again and again go to sa/m/sāra with birth and death, to existence in this way or in that way,--that is the state of avi/gg/ā.

7.
'For this avi/gg/ā is the great folly by which this (existence) has been traversed long, but those beings who resort to knowledge do not go to rebirth.

'"Should there be a perfect consideration of the Dyad in another way," if, O Bhikkhus, there are people that ask so, they shall be told, there is, and how there is: "Whatever pain arises is all in consequence of the sa/m/khāras (matter)," this is one consideration, "but from the complete destruction of the sa/m/khāras, through absence of passion, there is no origin of pain," this is the second consideration; thus, O Bhikkhus, by the Bhikkhu that considers the Dyad duly, that is strenuous, ardent, resolute, of two fruits one fruit is to be expected: in this world perfect knowledge, or, if any of the (five) attributes still remain, the state of an Anāgāmin (one that does not return).' This said Bhagavat; (and) when Sugata had said this, the Master further spoke:

8.
'Whatever pain arises is all in consequence of the sa/m/khāras, by the destruction of the sa/m/khāras there will be no origin of pain.

9.
'Looking upon this pain that springs from the sa/m/khāras as misery, from the cessation of all the sa/m/khāras, and from the destruction of consciousness will arise the destruction of pain, having understood this exactly,

10.
'The wise who have true views and are accomplished, having understood (all things) completely, and having conquered all association with Māra, do not go to re-birth.

'"Should there be a perfect consideration of the Dyad in another way," if, O Bhikkhus, there are people that ask so, they shall be told, there is, and how there is: "Whatever pain arises is all in consequence of vi/ńń/ā/n/a (consciousness)," this is one consideration, "but from the complete destruction of vi/ńń/ā/n/ana, through absence of passion, there is no origin of pain," this is the second consideration; thus, O Bhikkhus, by the Bhikkhu that considers the Dyad duly, that is strenuous, ardent, resolute, of two fruits one fruit is to be expected: in this world perfect knowledge, or, if any of the (five) attributes still remain, the state of an Anāgāmin (one that does not return).' This said Bhagavat, (and) when Sugata had said this, the Master further spoke:

11.
'Whatever pain arises is all in consequence of vi/ńń/ā/n/a, by the destruction of vi/ńń/ā/n/a there is no origin of pain.

12.
'Looking upon this pain that springs from vi/ńń/ā/n/a as misery, from the cessation of vi/ńń/ā/n/a a Bhikkhu free from desire (will be) perfectly happy (parinibbuta).

'"Should there be a perfect consideration of the Dyad in another way," if, O Bhikkhus, there are people that ask so, they shall be told, there is, and how there is: "Whatever pain arises is all in consequence of phassa (touch)," this is one consideration, "but from the complete destruction of phassa, through absence of passion, there is no origin of pain," this is the second consideration; thus, O Bhikkhus, by the Bhikkhu that considers the Dyad duly, that is strenuous, ardent, resolute, of two fruits one fruit is to be expected: in this world perfect knowledge, or, if any of the (five) attributes still remain, the state of an Anāgāmin (one that does not return).' This said Bhagavat, (and) when Sugata had said this, the Master further spoke:

13.
'For those who are ruined by phassa, who follow the stream of existence, who have entered a bad way, the destruction of bonds is far off.

14.
'But those who, having fully understood phassa, knowingly have taken delight in cessation, they verily from the comprehension of phassa, and being free from desire, are perfectly happy.

'"Should there be a perfect consideration of the Dyad in another way," if, O Bhikkhus, there are people that ask so, they shall be told, there is, and how there is: "Whatever pain arises is all in consequence of the vedanās (sensations)," this is one consideration, "but from the complete destruction of the vedanās, through absence of passion, there no origin of pain," this is the second consideration; thus, O Bhikkhus, by the Bhikkhu that considers the Dyad duly, that is strenuous, ardent, resolute, of two fruits one fruit is to be expected: in this world perfect knowledge, or, if any of the (five) attributes still remain, the state of an Anāgāmin (one that does not return).' This said Bhagavat, (and) when Sugata had said this, the Master further spoke:

15.
'Pleasure or pain, together with want of pleasure and want of pain, whatever is perceived internally and externally,

16.
'Looking upon this as pain, having touched what is perishable and fragile, seeing the decay (of everything), the Bhikkhu is disgusted, having from the perishing of the vedanās become free from desire, and perfectly happy.

'"Should there be a perfect consideration of the Dyad in another way," if, O Bhikkhus, there are people that ask so, they shall be told, there is, and how there is: "Whatever pain arises is all in consequence of ta/n/hā (desire)," this is one consideration, "but from the complete destruction of ta/n/hā, through absence of passion, there is no origin of pain," this is the second consideration; thus, O Bhikkhus, by the Bhikkhu that considers the Dyad duly, that is strenuous, ardent, resolute, of two fruits one fruit is to be expected: in this world perfect knowledge, or, if any of the (five) attributes still remain, the state of an Anāgāmin (one that does not return).' This said Bhagavat, (and) when Sugata had said this, the Master further spoke:

Continued...

17.
'A man accompanied by ta/n/hā, for a long time transmigrating into existence in this way or that way, does not overcome transmigration (sa/ms/āra).

18.
'Looking upon this as misery, this origin of the pain of ta/n/hā, let the Bhikkhu free from ta/n/hā, not seizing (upon anything), thoughtful, wander about.

'"Should there be a perfect consideration of the Dyad in another way," if, O Bhikkhus, there are people that ask so, they shall be told, there is, and how there is: "Whatever pain arises is all in consequence of the upādānas (the seizures)," this is one consideration, "but from the complete destruction of the upādānas, through absence of passion, there is no origin of pain," this is the second consideration; thus, O Bhikkhus, by the Bhikkhu that considers the Dyad duly, that is strenuous, ardent, resolute, of two fruits one fruit is to be expected: in this world perfect knowledge, or, if any of the (five) attributes still remain, the state of an Anāgāmin (one that does not return).' This said Bhagavat, (and) when Sugata had said this, the Master further spoke:

19.
'The existence is in consequence of the upādānas; he who has come into existence goes to pain, he who has been born is to die, this is the origin of pain.

20.
'Therefore from the destruction of the upādānas the wise with perfect knowledge, having seen (what causes) the destruction of birth, do not go to re-birth.

'"Should there be a perfect consideration of the Dyad in another way," if, O Bhikkhus, there are people that ask so, they shall be told, there is, and how there is: "Whatever pain arises is all in consequence of the ārambhas (exertions)," this is one consideration, "but from the complete destruction of the ārambhas, through absence of passion, there is no origin of pain," this is the second consideration; thus, O Bhikkhus, by the Bhikkhu that considers the Dyad duly, that is strenuous, ardent, resolute, of two fruits one fruit is to be expected: in this world perfect knowledge, or, if any of the (five) attributes still remain, the state of an Anāgāmin (one that does not return).' This said Bhagavat, (and) when Sugata had said this, the Master further spoke:

21.
'Whatever pain arises is all in consequence of the ārambhas, by the destruction of the ārambhas there is no origin of pain.

23.
'Looking upon this pain that springs from the ārambhas as misery, having abandoned all the ārambhas, birth and transmigration have been crossed over by the Bhikkhu who is liberated in non-exertion, who has cut off the desire for existence, and whose mind is calm; there is for him no re-birth.

'"Should there be a perfect consideration of the Dyad in another way," if, O Bhikkhus, there are people that ask so, they shall be told, there is, and how there is: "Whatever pain arises is all in consequence of the āhāras (food?)," this is one consideration, "but from the complete destruction of the āhāras, through absence of passion, there is no origin of pain," this is the second consideration; thus, O Bhikkhus, by the Bhikkhu that considers the Dyad duly, that is strenuous, ardent, resolute, of two fruits one fruit is to be expected: in this world perfect knowledge, or, if any of the (five) attributes still remain, the state of an Anāgāmin (one that does not return).' This said Bhagavat, (and) when Sugata had said this, the Master further spoke:

24.
'Whatever pain arises is all in consequence of the āhāras, by the destruction of the āhāras there is no origin of pain.

25.
'Looking upon this pain that springs from the āhāras as misery, having seen the result of all āhāras, not resorting to all āhāras,

26.
'Having seen that health is from the destruction of desire, he that serves discriminatingly and stands fast in the Dhamma cannot be reckoned as existing, being accomplished.

'"Should there be a perfect consideration of the Dyad in another way," if, O Bhikkhus, there are people that ask so, they shall be told, there is, and how there is: "Whatever pain arises is all in consequence of the i/ńg/itas (commotions)," this is one consideration, "but from the complete destruction of the i/ńg/itas, through absence of passion, there is no origin of pain," this is the second consideration; thus, O Bhikkhus, by the Bhikkhu that considers the Dyad duly, that is strenuous, ardent, resolute, of two fruits one fruit is to be expected: in this world perfect knowledge, or, if any of the (five) attributes still remain, the state of an Anāgāmin (one that does not return).' This said Bhagavat, (and) when Sugata had said this, the Master further spoke:

27.
'Whatever pain arises is all in consequence of the i/ńg/itas, by the destruction of the i/ńg/itas there is no origin of pain.

28.
'Looking upon this pain that springs from the i/ńg/itas as misery, and therefore having abandoned the i/ńg/itas and having stopped the sa/m/khāras; let the Bhikkhu free from desire and not seizing (upon anything), thoughtful, wander about.

'"Should there be a perfect consideration of the Dyad in another way," if, O Bhikkhus, there are people that ask so, they shall be told, there is, and how there is: "For the nissita (dependent) there is vacillation," this is one consideration, "the independent (man) does not vacillate," this is the second consideration; thus, O Bhikkhus, by the Bhikkhu that considers the Dyad duly, that is strenuous, ardent, resolute, of two fruits one fruit is to be expected: in this world perfect knowledge, or, if any of the (five) attributes still remain, the state of an Anāgāmin (one that does not return).' This said Bhagavat, (and) when Sugata had said this, the Master further spoke:

29.
'The independent (man) does not vacillate, and the dependent (man) seizing upon existence in one way or in another, does not overcome sa/m/sāra.

.

30.
'Looking upon this as misery (and seeing) great danger in things you depend upon, let a Bhikkhu wander about independent, not seizing (upon anything), thoughtful.

'"Should there be a perfect consideration of the Dyad in another way," if, O Bhikkhus, there are people that ask so, they shall be told, there is, and how there is: "The formless (beings), O Bhikkhus, are calmer than the rūpas (for ruppa, i.e. form-possessing)," this is one consideration, "cessation is calmer than the formless," this is another consideration, "thus, O Bhikkhus, by the Bhikkhu that considers the Dyad duly, that is strenuous, ardent, resolute, of two fruits one fruit is to be expected: in this world perfect knowledge, or, if any of the (five) attributes still remain, the state of an Anāgāmin (one that does not return).' This said Bhagavat, (and) when Sugata had said this, the Master further spoke:

31.
'Those beings who are possessed of form, and those who dwell in the formless (world), not knowing cessation, have to go to re-birth.

32.
'But those who, having fully comprehended the forms, stand fast in the formless (worlds), those who are liberated in the cessation, such beings leave death behind.

'"Should there be a perfect consideration of the Dyad in another way," if, O Bhikkhus, there are people that ask so, they shall be told, there is, and how there is: "What has been considered true by the world of men, together with the gods, Māra, Brahman, and amongst the Sama/n/as, Brāma/n/as, gods, and men, that has by the noble through their perfect knowledge been well seen to be really false," this is one consideration; "what, O Bhikkhus, has been considered false by the world of men, together with the gods, Māra, Brahman, and amongst the Sama/n/as, Brāma/n/as, gods, and men, that has by the noble through their perfect knowledge been well seen to be really true," this is another consideration. Thus, O Bhikkhus, by the Bhikkhu that considers the Dyad duly, that is strenuous, ardent, resolute, of two fruits one fruit is to be expected: in this world perfect knowledge, or, if any of the (five) attributes still remain, the state of an Anāgāmin (one that does not return).' This said Bhagavat, (and) when Sugata had said this, the Master further spoke:

33.
'Seeing the real in the unreal, the world of men and gods dwelling in name and form, he thinks: "This is true."

34.
'Whichever way they think (it), it becomes otherwise, for it is false to him, and what is false is perishable. (?)

35.
'What is not false, the Nibbāna, that the noble conceive as true, they verily from the comprehension of truth are free from desire (and) perfectly happy.

'"Should there be a perfect consideration of the Dyad in another way," if, O Bhikkhus, there are people that ask so, they shall be told, there is, and how there is: "What, O Bhikkhus, has been considered pleasure by the world of men, gods, Māra, Brahman, and amongst the Sama/n/as, Brāma/n/as, gods, and men, that has by the noble by (their) perfect knowledge been well seen to be really pain," this is one consideration; "what, O Bhikkhus, has been considered pain by the world of men, gods, Māra, Brahman, and amongst the Sama/n/as, Brāhma/n/as, gods, and men, that has by the noble by their perfect knowledge been well seen to be really pleasure," this is the second consideration. Thus, O Bhikkhus, by the Bhikkhu who considers the Dyad duly, who is strenuous, ardent, resolute, of two fruits one fruit is to be expected: in this world perfect knowledge, or, if any of the (five) attributes still remain, the state of an Anāgāmin (one who does not return).' This said Bhagavat, (and) when Sugata had said so, the Master further spoke:

36.
'Form, sound, taste, smell, and touch are all wished for, pleasing and charming (things) as long as they last, so it is said.

37.
'By you, by the world of men and gods these (things) are deemed a pleasure, but when they cease it is deemed pain by them.

38.
'By the noble the cessation of the existing body is regarded as pleasure; this is the opposite of (what) the wise in all the world (hold).

39.
'What fools say is pleasure that the noble say is pain, what fools say is pain that the noble know as pleasure:--see here is a thing difficult to understand, here the ignorant are confounded.

40.
'For those that are enveloped there is gloom, for those that do not see there is darkness, and for the good it is manifest, for those that see there is light; (even being) near, those that are ignorant of the way and the Dhamma, do not discern (anything).

41.
'By those that are overcome by the passions of existence, by those that follow the stream of existence, by those that have entered the realm of Māra, this Dhamma is not perfectly understood.

42.
'Who except the noble deserve the well-understood state (of Nibbāna)? Having perfectly conceived this state, those free from passion are completely extinguished.'

This spoke Bhagavat. Glad those Bhikkhus rejoiced at the words of Bhagavat. While this explanation was being given, the minds of sixty Bhikkhus, not seizing (upon anything), were liberated.

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-- Book 03 - Chapter 12 --





 
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