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Holy Confucian Analects

English translation by James Legge
taken from http://www.sacred-texts.com/cfu/cfu.htm
Chinese text taken from
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/webbin/gutbook/lookup?num=4094

Book 10 - Heang Tang -

Continued...

370
He was never without ginger when he ate. He did not eat much.

371
When he had been assisting at the prince's sacrifice, he did not keep the flesh which he received overnight. The flesh of his family sacrifice he did not keep over three days. If kept over three days, people could not eat it.

372
When eating, he did not converse. When in bed, he did not speak.

373
Although his food might be coarse rice and vegetable soup, he would offer a little of it in sacrifice with a grave, respectful air.

374
If his mat was not straight, he did not sit on it.

375
When the villagers were drinking together, upon those who carried staffs going out, he also went out immediately after.

376
When the villagers were going through their ceremonies to drive away pestilential influences, he put on his court robes and stood on the eastern steps.

377
When he was sending complimentary inquiries to any one in another state, he bowed twice as he escorted the messenger away.

378
Chi K'ang having sent him a present of physic, he bowed and received it, saying, "I do not know it. I dare not taste it."

379
The stable being burned down, when he was at court, on his return he said, "Has any man been hurt?" He did not ask about the horses.

380
When the he would adjust his mat, first taste it, and then give it away to others. When the prince sent him a gift of undressed meat, he would have it cooked, and offer it to the spirits of his ancestors. When the prince sent him a gift of a living animal, he would keep it alive.

381
When he was in attendance on the prince and joining in the entertainment, the prince only sacrificed. He first tasted everything.

382
When he was ill and the prince came to visit him, he had his head to the east, made his court robes be spread over him, and drew his girdle across them.

383
When the prince's order called him, without waiting for his carriage to be yoked, he went at once.

384
When he entered the ancestral temple of the state, he asked about everything.

385
When any of his friends died, if he had no relations offices, he would say, "I will bury him."

386
When a friend sent him a present, though it might be a carriage and horses, he did not bow.

387
The only present for which he bowed was that of the flesh of sacrifice.

388
In bed, he did not lie like a corpse. At home, he did not put on any formal deportment.

389
When he saw any one in a mourning dress, though it might be an acquaintance, he would change countenance; when he saw any one wearing the cap of full dress, or a blind person, though he might be in his undress, he would salute him in a ceremonious manner.

390
To any person in mourning he bowed forward to the crossbar of his carriage; he bowed in the same way to any one bearing the tables of population.

391
When he was at an entertainment where there was an abundance of provisions set before him, he would change countenance and rise up.

392
On a sudden clap of thunder, or a violent wind, he would change countenance.

393
When he was about to mount his carriage, he would stand straight, holding the cord.

394
When he was in the carriage, he did not turn his head quite round, he did not talk hastily, he did not point with his hands.

395
Seeing the countenance, it instantly rises. It flies round, and by and by settles.

396
The Master said, "There is the hen-pheasant on the hill bridge. At its season! At its season!" Tsze-lu made a motion to it. Thrice it smelt him and then rose.

397
The Master said, "The men of former times in the matters of ceremonies and music were rustics, it is said, while the men of these latter times, in ceremonies and music, are accomplished gentlemen.

398
"If I have occasion to use those things, I follow the men of former times."

399
The Master said, "Of those who were with me in Ch'an and Ts'ai, there are none to be found to enter my door."

400
Distinguished for their virtuous principles and practice, there were Yen Yuan, Min Tsze-ch'ien, Zan Po-niu, and Chung-kung; for their ability in speech, Tsai Wo and Tsze-kung; for their administrative talents, Zan Yu and Chi Lu; for their literary acquirements, Tsze-yu and Tsze-hsia.

401
The Master said, "Hui gives me no assistance. There is nothing that I say in which he does not delight."

402
The Master said, "Filial indeed is Min Tsze-ch'ien! Other people say nothing of him different from the report of his parents and brothers."

403
Nan Yung was frequently repeating the lines about a white scepter stone. Confucius gave him the daughter of his elder brother to wife.

404
Chi K'ang asked which of the disciples loved to learn. Confucius replied to him, "There was Yen Hui; he loved to learn. Unfortunately his appointed time was short, and he died. Now there is no one who loves to learn, as he did."

405
When Yen Yuan died, Yen Lu begged the carriage of the Master to sell and get an outer shell for his son's coffin.

406
The Master said, "Every one calls his son his son, whether he has talents or has not talents. There was Li; when he died, he had a coffin but no outer shell. I would not walk on foot to get a shell for him, because, having followed in the rear of the great officers, it was not proper that I should walk on foot."

407
When Yen Yuan died, the Master said, "Alas! Heaven is destroying me! Heaven is destroying me!"

408
When Yen Yuan died, the Master bewailed him exceedingly, and the disciples who were with him said, "Master, your grief is excessive!"

409
"Is it excessive?" said he. "If I am not to mourn bitterly for this man, for whom should I mourn?"

410
When Yen Yuan died, the disciples wished to give him a great funeral, and the Master said, "You may not do so."

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-- Book 10 --





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